Pauline Banes

Pauline Diana Baynes (9 September 1922 – 2 August 2008) was an English book illustrator, whose work encompassed more than 100 books, notably those by C. S. Lewis and J. R. R. Tolkien. She was born in Hove, Sussex.

Though her early years were spent in India, where her father was commissioner in Agra, she and her elder sister came to England for their schooling. Baynes attended the Slade School of Fine Art, but after a year she volunteered to work for the Ministry of Defence, where she made demonstration models for instruction courses. This work did not last long as she was soon transferred to a map-making department (knowledge of which she later employed to good effect when she drew maps of Narnia for C. S. Lewis and of Middle-earth for J. R. R. Tolkien).

Baynes is probably best known for her illustrations in The Chronicles of Narnia by C. S. Lewis. She was also J. R. R. Tolkien’s chosen illustrator: her drawings appear in Farmer Giles of Ham, The Adventures of Tom Bombadil, Smith of Wootton Major, Tree and Leaf, and after Tolkien’s death the poem Bilbo’s Last Song (as a poster in 1974, as a book in 1990).

(taken from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pauline_Baynes)

The Human Mind

You know when someone says to you a certain famliar name or place and you can see an image forming in your mind, or when you travel somewhere or do something and when you think about it you have no recollection of going there or doing it (spontaneous amnesia), have you ever wondered why it is that happens or how it works that you can visualize an image in your head. The human mind is a fascinating thing in itself and according to some theorists we only use on average 5% of its full strength. There has been debate that some people are able to focus more than others and therefore become pychics or mediums etc. I find this absolutely amazing. Imagine if we all had 100% use of our mind. Imagine the things possible to us and the doors it could open. Hopefully this post will encourage you to become interested and curious too.

  • How can we only use a percent of our brain?
  • Evidence shows we can use more.
  • Scientists and others in the psychological, sociological fields have asserted that humans use maybe .01 to.10 percent of our brain. Without getting all science geek about it there is an easier way of understanding what that means.
  • First let us clarify, mechanically you use 100% of your brain. Maximizing usage is another subject. So when someone puts a percentage of use on the brain they do not mean that the other say 90% is dormant or useless.
  • Think of it this way. Let’s say your brain is a stereo. When you are using your stereo you are using 100% of it. Here is the x factor. If the volume knob is set at say a 2 level then you are not getting the same usage when compared to turning the volume knob to 8 or 10.
  • So what scientists are trying to get across to us is we have a lot more room in our cranium to fill. We have more volume to boost. We are not even close to tapping our potential of brain power. The percentage is actually a moot point I would think in reality.
  • There is no physical data to determine in tangible evidence the amount of usage the human brain has. There are as many as if not more than 100 billion brain cells. Then there is the neuronal and synaptic connections. Interestingly there has been data that has determined that people have increased there brain power however.
  • Then there are the people who demonstrate mental abilities that are very rare. Some people with autism for example have had the ability to calculate very high levels of math equations without ever having learned how.
  • There is also more and more variables we are learning about the brain. Studies that suggest that even though our brain is one as a whole we evidently get production out of separate parts of the brain for different mental tasks. We have all heard of the right brain/left brain references for example.
  • So regardless of how you want to interpret the brain usage by percentage, the fact is it is the most amazing gift we have. A computer is nothing compared to the human brain. And we can build upon our ability to get more out of it. So turn up the volume button and get the old noggin’ working.
  • Taken fromhttp://scienceray.com/biology/human-biology/how-much-brain-do-we-use/